The Friday Feelgood for May 12, 2017

Hello hello and Happy Friday! This week for the Friday Feelgood, we wanted to share some of the recent news that’s made us go WOW!


star-nosed_mole.jpg

Popular Science shares an interview with a star-nosed mole researcher (so that’s a job!), who highlights findings like how the mole uses that star as a super-sensitive touch organ. The mole has also been found to be that fastest-eating mammal in the world – but I’d counter that they’ve never seen me when my mom makes enchiladas 😂 😂

gobekli-tepe-1.jpg

In news that might be literally out of this world and with almost too many cool names to count, researchers are sharing their theory that a pillar called the Vulture Stone at the archaeological site Göbekli Tepe in Turkey shows confirmation of a theorized comet strike thought to contribute to a miniature ice age about 12,800 years ago. Vulture Stone is definitely a Nicolas Cage movie waiting to happen, right?

Fossils_TA.jpg

In probably the biggest WOW we’ve had lately, human tools found alongside a mastodon now dated to be 130,000 years old suggest that humans may have come to the Americas more than 100,000 years before previously thought. That might change the way we understand a huge chunk of human history! (!!!)

PS how much does that picture make you love the internet!? Shoutout to Pixabay user SerenaWong!

What made you say wow this week? Let us know in the comments!

Lost cities

Happy Wednesday! This week we thought we’d take a look at some of history’s fascinating lost cities.

Karakorum

karakorum

Karakorum, a city on the old Silk Road, was once the capital of the Mongol Empire under Genghis Khan’s Ögedei.

Sarai Batu

sarai-batu-astrakhan-166

Amusing Planet takes a look at Sarai Batu, the lost city that was once the capital of the Golden Horde, and the film set designed to recreate it.

Xanadu

gx0a9188

With a name so well known many might not realize it refers to a real city, Xanadu, or Shangdu, was the summer capital of Kublai Khan’s Yuan Dynasty.

Do you have a favorite lost city story? Let us know in the comments!